Alien: Covenant, 2017

Directed by: Ridley Scott
Starring: Katherine Waterston, Michael Fassbender
While I ultimately have a lot of mixed feelings about Alien: Covenant, my main takeaway is that I quite enjoyed it. Certainly more so than its overly confusing predecessor Prometheus. My short review: if you’re a fan of the Alien franchise, then go watch Covenant. It’s pretty good, and answers many more questions than Prometheus ever did. If you’re not a fan, this one probably won’t change your mind.
 
To get into some more specifics, I walked in not knowing how direct of a sequel to Prometheus this would be. If I had I probably would have been less enthused to go see it, but nonetheless the film captured my attention with its dedication to world-building. Like no other film in the franchise, this one successfully expands the world of they inhabit and revitalises an interest in its history and intricacies. This is so much the case, that it almost makes Prometheus feel like a prequel to Covenant, rather than the other way round. I walked out of the movie simultaneously satisfied by what I had learned about the universe of the franchise and wanting to know more, which I see as a really good thing.
 
However, I didn’t come to watch two hours of lore, I came to watch a movie, and on that front I can only call it good, but not great, with a few really great bits. H.R. Geiger’s design work resonates strongly, and I liked the aesthetic of the new world and new creatures. I also thought that Michael Fassbender was fantastic, twice as good as the last one (watch the movie, you’ll get it). It looked and sounded great overall, and I can’t think of any bad performances. It had some really excellent tension, I was literally sitting on the edge of my seat, holding my breath for bits and that’s very commendable.
 
It also had an overall quite forgettable peripheral cast. Gone are the super charismatic and memorable side characters from James Cameron’s Aliens, centred around the notably great action hero Ripley. I only really remember the characters by their stereotypes, especially the incredibly on-the-nose Tennessee (who is actually pretty enjoyable, to the film’s credit). The entire premise is kind of meh, and the story hinges on one character continuously making some terrible terrible decisions. Yep, unfortunately this movie made me want to get up out of my seat and yell “DON’T GO INTO THE BASEMENT YOU MORON” and considering this is from the same director as Alien, one of the most influential Sci-Fi and Horror movies ever, I can’t give it a pass.
 
So yeah, mixed bag. Overall, it is a good time, and definitely worthwhile for fans of the series, but it’s a far cry from the first two films.

Get Out, 2017

Directed By: Jordan Peele

Starring: Daniel Kaluuya, Allison Williams

IMDb

Get Out is the best film that I’ve seen this year so far. I highly recommend you go see it. If you were avoiding it because you don’t like horror, rest assured that is more of a thriller, featuring more comedy elements than it does horror.

The characters and writing were great, and I really enjoyed the genuine suspense the plot had me in. I had no idea exactly where the film was going to go until it went there, but it didn’t cheat, there were plenty of clues. I don’t get that experience very often, so it was a real treat.

I also enjoyed the film’s aesthetic, using classic horror-esque techniques in colour palette, soundtrack and cinematography to get the audience on edge. The use of comedy in its first two acts to establish the racial themes in a lighthearted manner, before twisting them into the horrifying reality in the third is freaking brilliant.

Speaking of Comedy, the comic relief character is fantastic, one of the best parts of the movie. It really shows that the writer/director, Jordan Peele, is a comedy veteran. The more intense tones aren’t undercut by the comedy though, the balance is masterful.

Go see Get Out. Please. I want Jordan Peele to make more movies.

Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2, 2017

Directed by: James Gunn

Starring: Chris Pratt, Zoe Saldana, Dave Bautista, Bradley Cooper, Michael Rooker

IMDb
I think Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 bares many similarities to Avengers: Age of Ultron. Both films had a lot to live up to, both tried valiantly to outdo their predecessor in every aspect, both are very entertaining movies. Both don’t quite live up to the impossible expectations.

How does one outdo Guardians 1? Apparently the answer is take the aspect most praised and play them up tenfold. As a result, the soundtrack is back and more prominent than ever. The humorous tone was praised, so the sequel was given many more jokes. To be perfectly clear, each of these aspects taken individually make for a really good time. The issue is balance. The first film worked so well because it managed to balance its own quirky style with the typical marvel movie formula. Guardians 2 feels overloaded, unbalanced.

Not helping in the slightest is the story, which I feel is Guardians 2’s biggest shortcoming. Instead of one story, the film opts to tell about three or four, and none of them are really all that original. Honestly, they’re all pretty predictable. The first film wasn’t really anything all that special when it came to story, but what I can give it is that it was one thing, it was pretty tight.

All this said, I really enjoyed Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2. I’m still working on my ability to communicate my feelings towards movies, especially while criticising them. To be as clear as I can: Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 isn’t even a bad movie that I enjoyed bits of à la Batman V Superman or Suicide Squad. It’s a good movie, that entertained me thoroughly, but I couldn’t help but feel a tad let down. My expectations were a bit too high, and I criticise because I care.

The film did better its predecessor in a few respects, however. Depictions of much of the peripheral cast was much better. I really enjoyed spending more time with Drax, Yandu, and Rocket. Also, in its attempts to out-scope the previous film, it actually succeeded in setting up some awesome scenarios. Overall, the cinematography was also better, some really beautiful shots. The movie was really colourful and was overall really enjoyable to look at.

If you were planning on see Guardians 2, I say go right ahead, you’ll enjoy yourself.

Colossal, 2016

Directed by: Nacho Vigalondo
Starring: Anne Hathaway, Jason Sudeikis
Colossal came right out of nowhere and really surprised me. Before last week I hadn’t even heard of it, but after seeing it, I think it’s disappointing that it’s gone so under the radar.
 
To those that don’t know, the premise is that a failing alcoholic writer (Anne Hathaway) returns to her small home town after her boyfriend kicks her out. At the same time, a giant monster appears out of nowhere and starts attacking Seoul. After noticing a pattern, she realises she was the monster all along.
Not metaphorically, she is literally the monster. It’s weird, hard to describe, and super original.
 
I have to applaud the movie for its originality, it’s not quite like anything I’ve seen before, plot-wise, which is so rare in hollywood. It also falls into a sub-genre of film which I have a particular affection for: Films with a sci-fi/fantasy element, but are ultimately very human stories set in a real-world environment. Stories that focus on the human condition through the lens of the fantastical element. Notable examples of such films include Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless mind, Inception, Chronicle and Swiss Army Man. (Almost all of these are among my all time favourite movies btw)
 
Anne Hathaway and Jason Sudeikis both give great performances as the leads, and not to spoil the plot, they develop a very interesting dynamic.
 
The film gives a really satisfying blend of tones, balancing funny, charming, intense and honestly kind of horrifying at points. Not to say it’s without flaws: I didn’t love the side characters, Dan Stevens plays Hathaway’s boyfriend and he’s a bit of a typical controlling, untrusting boyfriend. Also, there were a few points that the film was trying portray horrifying situations, but they came off a bit silly and hard to take seriously. They, however, were only small blemishes on an overall really good product.
 
 
Anyway, if you can catch it before it fades into obscurity, I definitely recommend you go watch it!

Top 10 Scenes in Raimi’s Spider-Man Trilogy

So about a year ago, long before the existence of this blog, I made a youtube video outlining what I think are the 10 best scenes in the original Spider-Man trilogy. I was surprised to find that there didn’t already exist such a video, only to find that the same is true for most movies. In the public conscience, moments are prioritised over scenes these days, so I suppose it isn’t really surprising.

I recently had to edit and re-upload the video due to a copyright claim (I basically played an entire scene in the original video), so I thought I’d share it here.

Enjoy!

The Lego Batman Movie, 2017

Directed by: Chris McKay

Starring: Will Arnett, Michael Cera, Rosario Dawson

IMDB

I probably set my expectations too high for The Lego Batman Movie. The marketing made it look like a non-stop joke fest, with tonnes of Batman and other pop-culture references, while keeping the super fast pace of The Lego Movie. The movie I actually saw was actually pretty good, but I did feel like it was lacking in a number of respects, unfortunately.
My main criticism would have to be with the characters. They’re set up well and are all likeable, but every single one of them was completely one-note. Batman is arrogant, Alfred is the concerned father figure, Robin was the wide-eyed innocent youth and Barbara Gordon was the responsible police-badass. Batman was given a lesson to learn: learn to let others into his life, but the process of this actually happening happens over the course of about two minutes in the third act via Deus Ex Machina. Watching Batman make the same mistake and continuously not learning from it is much like watching a puppy be confused by his own reflection in the mirror: at first it’s hilarious, but after an hour and a half it’s exhausting, and you start to question the mental health of the puppy.
I also feel like the comedic timing was just slightly off. I feel like they were expecting laughs, so left pauses in so the audience wouldn’t miss the next line. It came off as a little disjointed in the relatively quiet cinema I was in.
One last thing I’d like to address is the use of references. The film uses a copious amount of pop culture references, many of them being completely seperate to Batman (Harry Potter, Lord of the Rings, Doctor Who etc.) Unfortunately the film falls into the trap of thinking that acknowledging a thing exists counts as a joke. It does not. For examples of other films that fall into this trap, turn to any of the ‘Scary Movie’ or ‘Movie Movie’ franchise. Serial offenders.

Overall, if you’re a child or a nerd, you’ll enjoy The Lego Batman Movie, but it’s not as good as the Lego Movie.

Beauty and the Beast, 2017

Directed by: Bill Condon 

Starring: Emma Watson, Dan Stevens 

IMDb

Beauty and the Beast (2017) is a passable film, but a disappointing remake.
Unlike previous Disney animated-to-live-action remakes, Beauty and the Beast opts to change practically nothing about its narrative or characters. What they opt to change instead, is to add the forgettable songs from the theatrical version, add in approximately one minute of Belle’s back-story and contemporise one character. These changes don’t justify this film’s existence, the animated version is pretty much as perfect an animated fairytale can be, so remaking it comes off as no more than a cash grab. And considering it’s already the highest grossing musical ever, consider the cash grabbed.
The most insulting thing to me about Beauty and the Beast is that it does nothing better than the original. For instance, the musical numbers; in the opening number “Belle”, the townsfolk lack (excuse the pun) animation, they all just sort of stand there and sing their lines a bit awkwardly. Thankfully, this is the only number that does this, but all of the new songs are boring, and are treated as second rate by the film, never really opting for any interesting visuals to accompany them. The big numbers like “Be Our Guest” and “Beauty and the Beast” are pretty great, but still do not eclipse the excellence of the animated version. If you go back and watch the original, you’ll see that the animation really is very impressive.
Despite my thus far heavy criticism, there were things I liked in the film. The casting is spot on, Emma Watson and Dan Stevens both do a fantastic job as the leads, I really liked Ewen McGregor and Ian McKellen as Lumiere and Cogsworth. Emma Thompson was great as Mrs Potts and Luke Evans was perfect as Gaston. And Josh Gad, ever the controversy, was a fan favourite as LeFou, pulling the most laughs out of the audience. The changes they made to his character, however, are pretty skin-deep, never amounting to much more than jokes about how gay he is.
The set design, costuming and special effects were all fantastic as well. I just wish I was seeing a new movie to accompany them. Something I noticed is that during the screening a surprising amount of the audience was talking over the film. I wondered why, until I likened it to how people talk over movies that they’ve already watched a million times before. That’s what Beauty and the Beast (2017) is, a movie you’ve already seen a million times.
Go re-watch the Best Picture Nominated version instead.

Logan, 2017

Directed by: James Mangold 

Starring: Hugh Jackman, Patrick Stewart, Dafne Keen

IMDb

Logan was fucking fantastic. Emphasis on the word fuck, the film certainly loves to use it.

And there really is a certain catharsis to finally see the character actually acting the way you imagine he would, no longer bound to a single ‘fuck’ per film, to conform to the American Rating system’s version of ‘M for mature audiences’ (PG-13). I’ve been hoping to see a no-holds-barred Wolverine movie for years, and now in a post-Deadpool world, Fox finally has the guts to pull it off. If you’ve ever wished to see Wolverine drunkenly slash someone’s head in half, this movie was made for you.

Beyond the rating, the film does a good job of sticking to the grim, personal tone and themes presented to us in the trailer. Barring a few clichés, this is a very different comic book movie, and in contrast to last year’s very derivative X-Men Apocalypse, I found that very refreshing. Even Deadpool thrived on the very tropes that it incessantly mocked, so I applaud the producers for allowing this movie to happen.

The story is good, the new characters are memorable, and the cinematography did it’s job more than adequately. The best aspects of Logan, however, were Hugh Jackman, Patrick Stewart and the action scenes. These actors own their characters, and have done for the last 17 years. I have little more to say than they totally nailed it. The action really steals the show though, it’s what fans of the character have been waiting years for. It’s unapologetically brutal, well shot and doesn’t feel choreographed, it feels raw. It’s awesome.

I’m slightly hesitant to call this the best X-Men film. It’s so distinct from the rest of the franchise in its themes and characters. It is, however, probably the best film in the franchise.

It’s a little long, at 2 hours 21 minutes, but I don’t really see that as too bad of a criticism as I loved every second. I know I tend to go nuts over comic book/ superhero flicks, so if you feel like taking this all with a grain of salt, feel free, but this is definitely one of the better ones out there. Go see it.